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About ONCE

Negative carbon emissions are considered to be a promising approach to the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 2.0°C or perhaps even 1.5°C by the end of this century. The ocean has a large capacity to sequester carbon and has absorbed approximately 25% of the CO2 produced by fossil fuel combustion and cement production since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Increasing ocean carbon sinks by anthropogenic processes ...
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Stakeholders Provide Constructive Suggestions on the Zero Draft of 2022 UN Ocean Conference Political Declaration

Mar 26, 2022

Stakeholders Provide Constructive Suggestions on the Zero Draft of 2022 UN Ocean Conference Political Declaration

On 23 March 2022, an online briefing was convened by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) to provide an ...

Research Center for Marine Carbon Sink and Biogeochemical Process Approved

Nov 28, 2021

Research Center for Marine Carbon Sink and Biogeochemical Process Approved

Recently, the Research Center for Marine Carbon Sink and Biogeochemical Process under the National Natural Science Foundation of China ...

Publication

Microbial production of recalcitrant  dissolved organic matter: long-term  carbon storage in the global ocean

Microbial production of recalcitrant dissolved organic matter: long-term carbon storage in the global ocean

The biological pump is a process whereby CO2 in the upper ocean is fixed by primary producers and transported to the deep ocean as sinking biogenic particles or as dissolved organic...

Microbes mediated comprehensive carbon sequestration for negative emissions in the ocean

Microbes mediated comprehensive carbon sequestration for negative emissions in the ocean

The crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic is warning of a more profound crisis—climate change. Since the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation, have led to...

Correcting a major error in assessing organic carbon pollution in natural waters

Correcting a major error in assessing organic carbon pollution in natural waters

Microbial degradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aquatic environments can cause oxygen depletion, water acidification, and CO2 emissions. These problems are caused by labile DOC (LDOC) and not refractory DOC (RDOC)...

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